An Archive of Sold Items
Everything in this section is for reference only. All items have been sold.


CHILD & CHILD

Rare Pre-Raphaelite Tiara

Back

CHILD & CHILD

Rare Pre-Raphaelite Tiara

Silver Enamel Citrine

W  35.00cm (13.78 in)  |  D  5.50cm (2.17 in)

Origin British, c. 1900

Exhibited: Crowning Glories, Two Centuries of Tiaras, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, March 1 - June 25, 2000, 'The outstretched wings, engraved with a feather pattern, and enamelled translucent blue, enclose a large cushion-shaped citrine representing the sun. This motif, often combined with cobras, decorated the walls & doors of ancient Egyptian architecture & was revived by nineteenth-century designers for the decorative arts. Christopher Dresser, in his Principles of Decorative Design {1873), was so impressed by the severity, rigidity of line, and dignity of Egyptian ornament that he stated that he knew 'of few instances where forms of an ornamental character have been combined in a manner either more quaint or more interesting than the example of the Winged disc or globe,' which he identified as a symbol of protection. Since the Kensington firm of Child & Child was patronized by William Holman Hunt & Sir Edward Burne Jones with others of the pre-Raphaelite circle, this tiara represents their taste'.
Engraved silver in the form of an emblematic winged globe with a large cushion-shaped citrine Decorated with translucent blue enamel.
Exhibited: One Hundred Tiaras, an evolution of style 1800-1900, Wartski, 1997, catalogue number 88. Tiara, Diana Scarisbrick, 2000, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, illustrated page 175.

Literature
Exhibited: Crowning Glories, Two Centuries of Tiaras, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, March 1 - June 25, 2000, 'The outstretched wings, engraved with a feather pattern, and enamelled translucent blue, enclose a large cushion-shaped citrine representing the sun. This motif, often combined with cobras, decorated the walls & doors of ancient Egyptian architecture & was revived by nineteenth-century designers for the decorative arts. Christopher Dresser, in his Principles of Decorative Design {1873), was so impressed by the severity, rigidity of line, and dignity of Egyptian ornament that he stated that he knew ""of few instances where forms of an ornamental character have been combined in a manner either more quaint or more interesting than the example of the Winged disc or globe,"" which he identified as a symbol of protection. Since the Kensington firm of Child & Child was patronized by William Holman Hunt & Sir Edward Burne Jones with others of the pre-Raphaelite circle, this tiara represents their taste'.

Price Code

Ref No   2278

Sold

CALL DEALER